Intentional community & responsible autonomy

Lassor's graduate thesis uses speculative design interventions to capture the optimistic spirit of the motor age, while being mindful of its long term social, environmental, and economic consequences. The projects were informed by Lassor's research on urbanism and the history of car culture.

project title:
You Are on the Fastest Route
context:
‘You Are on the Fastest Route’ is Lassor's MFA Graduate Thesis. It captures his design work and thinking around the future of urbanism and transportation, and was completed at the MFA Products of Design program at the School of Visual Arts.
skills:
Branding
Design Research
Graphic Design
infographics
Information Architecture
Writing
User Research:
The research process for ‘You Are on the Fastest Route’ involved dozens of interviews with experts from a wide variety of disciplines. These included social critics, policy makers, authors, designers, and academics. Stakeholders I spoke with included engineers and managers inside organizations developing transportation technology solutions, as well as urban planners and researchers at social institutions.
Lassor's designs and writing were informed by research derived from dozens of expert interviews and books.
'You Are on the Fastest Route' started as an exploration of the future of AV, but soon grew to encompass urbanism more broadly.

‘You Are on the Fastest Route’ was Lassor’s graduate thesis. The work included product designs reply informed by qualitative user research, and primary source readings and interviews. “I spoke with many of the authors of books I had read, but I was especially fortunate to get ahold of Robert Lutz, who ran product design at General Motors for decades”, Lassor said. “He thinks self-driving cars will make styling and performance obsolete, that they will obliterate his life’s work and many conventions of our way of life”.

Lassor’s research and design work ultimately drew him towards the urban planning world. “A wonderful compliment to my interview with Robert Lutz was a correspondence I shared with the prominent urban planner and walkability expert Jeff Speck. His writings clarified how destructive our choices around mobility could be, and he has codified a playbook to start to reverse those trends”. Lassor’s design work and writing explored the interplay and balance of community and autonomy in the context of mobility. “The goal was that this work would form a road map for how technology interventions might help form a healthier balance with mobility, both as


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